Obfuscated Ursidae

Art Education, illustration, inspiration, and Nintendo.



About me.   Can you repeat the question?  

Drinking early grey and watching YouTube videos while the cold animals cuddle with me. Only six more progress reports to write, then bf is treating me to lunch at Waffle House! …maybe one more video before I finish writing about these students. 

Added a new poster/feature to the art room this year! Going to show off a new artist every month. I’m starting small with Pablo Picasso and his ceramic works, but hoping to move on to much lesser known artists as the year progresses. Working on clay plates with the 4th graders and abstract oil pastel doodles with the 3rd graders in order to highlight Picasso!

More Mandala Spinners from my 2nd graders! These are finally starting to come together! I’m having to put the brads into the center myself, but the kids cut their own circles, designed and drew their own symmetrical designs, inked, and colored everything on their own. Some really ran with my Nintendo example (from here) and did Minecraft characters, etc. and some kept it really simple with shapes and elementary school symbols.

Reblogged from mugglenet

Fantasy Life comes out next Friday, October the 24th! Really excited to play this game! (I’ve even got a countdown going in my calendar.) I’ve already decided I want my character to start out as an angler and kinda grow from a small-town hobbit-type girl that ends up going on a big adventure!

PS. Images from here.

Anyone else from the Animal Crossing fandom planning on getting this game? Have you already decided what lives you want to play?

Reblogged from thisartadventure

artfulartsyamy:

thisartadventure:

I’ve attempted this Lichtenstein project in years past but I think I finally perfected it at the end of the semester in my intro class last year. There are a lot of steps so I’m just going to outline them all!

1. Introduce Lichtenstein- I always show a million examples and talk about the drama of the moment in each painting. We talk about scale, colors, benday dots, and the combination of words and facial expression. I also show them the comics his paintings are based on and let them decide if it was ok for him to steal them for his paintings or not. 

2. Pre-planning- Students decide on their facial expression and what they are saying/thinking. They also have to decide what side or corner of the canvas they will be in.

3. Picture Day!- While most of the students are still working on another project I pull them out and take their pictures one at a time. I set them up with a white background and position the camera so they are in the same place in the picture that they will be in the painting (leave room for the bubble). They have to make their expression for the picture. 

4. I print the picture 8x10 in black and white. May need to be lightened a bit if shadows are heavy. 

5. (It’s really important to have examples to show for these next few steps!) On the printouts of the pictures, students take sharpies and draw over the contours of their face and anything else that is showing. They have the option to change or edit things if they want to. I remind them to add some stylized lines to give their hair texture. 

6. This step is so important! I’ve skipped it before and it makes the process too confusing. Using a light box, students trace ONLY the sharpied lines and the 8x10 box onto a clean piece of paper. This is usually when I have them add their bubble and words. 

7. Grid Time! Students draw a 1” grid on their paper and a 2” grid on a 16x20 canvas then transfer their drawing, square by square. Include bubble, words, and anything in the background.

8. Once the drawing is transferred, erase grid lines as much as possible. Then I have them map out their color scheme and put in the background and other solid colors. I had this group stick to primary and secondary colors (with a few exceptions).

9. The hardest part, the dots! This time I made 1/2” dot guides (see picture.) They used the back of a small paintbrush or a q-tip and shifted the guide with each line. This part is so frustrating. I encourage them to start in the smallest spaces and seriously take their time.

10. FINALLY the very last step is to paint in the black lines. I demonstrate varying their line thickness for added interest and using a bit of water so the paintbrush moves more smoothly. 

I love this project because the students are usually surprised by how well their paintings turn out. They gain confidence in their drawing and painting skills and there is room for embellishment and personalization for those kids who want to take it to the next level! I’ll post some finished paintings next…

BEAST project!!

Hi again, Tumblr! Sorry I’ve been gone so long! 

Took my 2nd graders outside to make more mandalas! À la Kathy Klein.

Haunting the town of January with a new graveyard— just in time for Halloween!

Reblogged from grumpysalmon

(Source: grumpysalmon, via monster-hugs)

Gonna be making paper fashion on Monday with the 5th graders!

Anonymous said: Your mandala is really cool!

Whee! Thank you! I’ve decided to just call them radial symmetry spinners so that I don’t take away from actual Hindu and Buddhist mandalas. I think that way the 2nd graders will have more respect for the cultures we study.

But I’m so glad you like it! I’ll post more when I have more!

The second graders did SO WELL on my mandala\radial balance project! I can’t wait to upload more! (With better quality photos.)

The second graders did SO WELL on my mandala\radial balance project! I can’t wait to upload more! (With better quality photos.)

Reblogged from emilyvalenza

emilyvalenza:

On a whim, I decided to shake up my first grade batik unit, which is normally just an oil-pastel resist. The results were always nice, but not very exciting or dynamic. 

This morning, I traced an animal batik motif with elmer’s glue and white 3D fabric paint and let each dry. After school ended, I tested both.

Even a light watercolor wash didn’t show up much with the elmer’s glue, and the glue spread out quite a lot as it dried, so it was impossible to easily discern areas for oil pastel decoration. 

As you can see, the white fabric paint (puffy paint to children of the 90’s) held up incredibly well- even with an india ink wash! 

I can’t wait to try this with a class now… next stop, update that blowfish demo with fabric paint… they’re the cutest! 

My mandala/radial balance example that I will be introducing to my 2nd graders tomorrow. There’s a brass brad in the middle so the three layers can spin. I hope they come up with some cute ideas, but this project may be a little complicated. I’ll keep you guys updated!

My mandala/radial balance example that I will be introducing to my 2nd graders tomorrow. There’s a brass brad in the middle so the three layers can spin. I hope they come up with some cute ideas, but this project may be a little complicated. I’ll keep you guys updated!